Social Justice Through the Lens of the Cross A Case for a Biblical Foundation of Social Work

Main Article Content

Allison Pryor Kasch

Keywords

social justice, human rights, Inside-Out apologetic, Christianity

Abstract

The profession of social work esteems the value of social justice, as social workers promote the well-being of society and the rights every individual holds. Although social justice is a core value of social work, it is necessary to address the foundation of social justice within its secular context, and questioning the “why” behind social justice calls for a deeper understanding of social work. Using the “Inside-Out” apologetic approach demonstrates how the secular grounding of social work neglects to provide the foundation required to make claims on the necessity of social justice. A Christian foundation, however, offers the grounding needed to support the values and mission of social work, and it is valuable to support a Christian understanding of social work.

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