Four Narratives and a Baby: An Adoption Reunion Story

Main Article Content

Helen Wilson Harris
Jennifer R Hale
Beth Oldham
Caitlin Powell

Keywords

adoption, birth mother, family, adoption reunion

Abstract

In 1992, a 19-year-old single mother of one made the decision to place her second child, a newborn, for adoption. This qualitative exploration of adoption issues is written, in part, in first person by the authors: the birthmother, the daughter she raised, the daughter she placed, and the adoptive mother. The article explores adoption reunion, adoption literature, and a scriptural adoption narrative for themes and for recommendations. The authors address negative stereotypes around adoption, the common theme of loss in all parties, and the potential for healing in reunion through life stage changes, including marriage and the next generation. This is a unique opportunity to hear the multiple voices of adoption in one narrative.

Abstract 66 |

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